Monthly Archives

How to Choose—and Use—a Lactation Consultant

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How to Choose—and Use—a Lactation Consultant

Certified lactation consultant and mother of three answers common questions she hears from breastfeeding mothers

 If you’re able to weed through all the information and opinions and finally decide whether you’re going to breastfeed your baby, then comes the hard part—learning how to do it. Enter the lactation consultant. Alissa Gomez-Dean, certified lactation consultant with Breastfeeding USA and mother of three, says there are three types of consultants, who range from international board certified lactation consultants (IBCLC), who have the most training and are considered experts; to middle range certified lactation consultants; to volunteers/mothers who don’t have accreditation, but who have “been there, done that...
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Do Hospitals Discourage Breastfeeding by Gifting Formula?

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Do Hospitals Discourage Breastfeeding by Gifting Formula?

For decades, hospitals have supplied new moms with gift bags filled with blankets, booties and baby formula. But formula freebies are increasingly disappearing from these goodie bags as studies show that mothers may view the gift as an implied endorsement from doctors that formula is better than breastfeeding.

“At the time of birth, many women are sitting on the fence on their decision to breastfeed or not,” says Rafael Perez-Escamilla, director of the Office of Public Health Practice at Yale’s School of Public Health. “Formula samples received from a medical facility signals to the mom that formula feeding is medically endorsed.”

But it’s not, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics...

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Breastfed Babies May Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease in Adulthood

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Breastfed Babies May Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease in Adulthood

Breastfeeding is linked to lower inflammation levels, which predict heart disease risk in adulthood.

Breastfeeding may protect against inflammation and heart disease when babies reach young adulthood, according to researchers from Northwestern University.

Researchers evaluated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), which is a signal of inflammation and predicts increased cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk in adulthood, in nearly 7,000 young adults, ages 24 to 32. They traced the levels of CRP back to the young adults’ birth weight and how long they were breastfed...

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How I Handled the News: ‘Your Baby Needs a Helmet’

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“It’s not your fault.”

I wanted to believe him. Considering he was a doctor who specialized in cranial therapy and development, I should have believed him. But I didn’t.

I looked down at the beautiful head of my 6-month-old baby sitting in my lap and felt a rush of guilt spill over me.

I saw the flat spot. I had seen it since he was born. My husband and I tried to adjust the car seat; to use a baby positioner; to try to turn his head more one way rather than the other. But none of it had worked. After six months of trying, now we were here in a specialist’s office being told our baby needed a helmet.

According to a study in the journal “Pediatrics,” 47 percent of infants have flat spots on their he...

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Immunization Schedule Update: Top 5 Things You Need to Know

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Given the current measles outbreak, vaccines are in the news a lot right now. And there’s plenty of debate over getting vaccinated; who needs to, when, and why?

We want to help you make the best decisions for your family. So with the help of Rebecca Madan, M.D., a Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, N.Y., we’ve put together a vaccine cheat sheet of sorts. Here are the top 5 things you need to know about your child’s immunization schedule:

1. The schedule is updated.

Each year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in cooperation with the American Academy of Pediatrics, updates their schedule of recommended vaccinations, b...

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Study: Giving Babies Antibiotics May Cause Obesity Later in Life

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A study has found a possible link between giving young children antibiotics and them developing obesity later in life. The study focused on penicillin’s effects; however, the problem appears not to be caused by penicillin itself, but rather by the damage it does to certain types of good bacteria in the digestive tract.

The study, by microbiologist Martin Blaser at New York University, was conducted on mice. It adds to other studies, which found that children who were given antibiotics before 6 months of age were more likely to be overweight at 7 years old...

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How to Make Your Child’s Shots Less Stressful

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Parents and kids can agree: Shots hurt. We parents know that these vaccines provide babies with safe, proven protection against serious diseases. But that can be hard to explain to our little ones in a way they understand. What we can do is take steps to remove some of the stress that comes with vaccine visits to the doctor.

“Getting children each dose of every vaccine according to the recommended schedule is one of the most important things parents can do to help keep their children safe and healthy,” says Dr...

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AAP Limits RSV Prevention Medication

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The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has released new guidelines that could affect the way severe lower respiratory tract disease from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is prevented. RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children younger than 1 year of age in the United States.

Palivizumab prophylaxis, commonly known as Synagis, is a monoclonal antibody that has been shown to effectively prevent RSV. The AAP is now recommending that Synagis be administered only to infants born prematurely at 29 weeks’ gestation or less and to babies considered “high risk...

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